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About us

As with all walks of life, there are odd occasions when betting produces a disagreement between the service provider – the bookmaker – and the customer. These are called ‘betting disputes’. Betting disputes occur when there is a difference between what the customer expects to get paid and what the bookmaker is prepared to pay. A complaint against the bookmaker’s conduct – for instance, refusing to take a particular bet – does not constitute a dispute.

As a condition of each licence issued by the Gambling Commission, all bookmakers are obliged to appoint an independent third-party dispute resolution service which will adjudicate on a dispute if it proves impossible for the bookmaker and the customer to reach an agreed settlement. For on-course bookmakers (excluding the Tote and the on-course betting shops) at the 60 British horse racecourses, Tattersalls Committee is usually the appointed adjudicator.

Tattersalls Committee is comprised of ten unpaid independent members, who come from a wide variety of backgrounds and bring a broad spectrum of experience to the Committee. The members are as follows: -

  • Anthony Speelman (Chairman)
  • Mark Armitage
  • Andrew Bruce
  • Martin Densham
  • Michael Eckley
  • Francis Habbershaw
  • Sir Thomas Pilkington
  • Joe Scanlon
  • Tanya Stevenson
  • John White

Appointments to the Committee are approved by a third party, the Jockey Club, ensuring that the independence of the Committee is maintained.  Current appointments are due to expire on or before 31st August 2018.

The available members of the Committee meet in London on a quarterly basis to adjudicate on betting disputes and, if required, to discuss the Rules on Betting. The forthcoming meeting dates may be found on the ‘Adjudications’ page.

In order for a claim to be heard by the Committee, both bookmaker and customer are required to be bound by the terms and conditions of the adjudication process. These terms may be found on the ‘Adjudications’ page.  Claims must be submitted in the English language.  

Uniquely, the backer and bookmaker involved in the dispute over the returns on a bet are entitled (but not obliged) to address the Committee in person, allowing them to state their case and answer any questions that the Committee might have. All cases are heard in private. Importantly, the entire adjudication procedure is provided free of charge, so whether the dispute involves a few pounds or several thousand pounds, there are no restrictions and no barriers for the parties seeking independent adjudication. The adjudication is normally completed on the day of the hearing, although in rare cases more evidence will be sought prior to the final decision. Adjudication is reached by a simple majority of the Committee, with the Chairman having a casting vote in the event of a tie. 

In 2009, the Committee embarked on a consultation process to review the Rules on Betting. Stakeholders, interested parties and members of the public were given twelve weeks to respond to a consultation paper published by the Committee on its website. Details of the consultation process may be found in the ‘Consultation’ section of this website.